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© Sandrine Etienne-Manneville
Photo prise à l'avant (dans la protrusion) d'astrocytes primaires de rat en migration. Marquage par immunofluorescence montrant en rouge, p150 Glued, une protéine associée aux extrémités 'plus' des microtubules et en vert la tubuline des microtubules. La photographie montre l'accumulation de p150 Glued à l'avant des cellules en migration, où la protéine pourrait participer à l'ancrage des microtubules à la membrane plasmique. Pour essayer de corriger, les dérèglements observés lors de la migration des cellules d'astrocytes tumuraux ou gliomes on cherche à connaitre les mécanismes moléculaires fondamentaux qui controlent la polarisation et la migration cellulaires.
Publication : Protein science : a publication of the Protein Society

Interactions of apomyoglobin with membranes: mechanisms and effects on heme uptake

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Protein science : a publication of the Protein Society - 22 Jan 2007

Vernier G, Chenal A, Vitrac H, Barumandzadhe R, Montagner C, Forge V

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 17242377

Protein Sci. 2007 Mar;16(3):391-400

The last step of the folding reaction of myoglobin is the incorporation of a prosthetic group. In cells, myoglobin is soluble, while heme resides in the mitochondrial membrane. We report here an exhaustive study of the interactions of apomyoglobin with lipid vesicles. We show that apomyoglobin interacts with large unilamellar vesicles under acidic conditions, and that this requires the presence of negatively charged phospholipids. The pH dependence of apomyoglobin interactions with membranes is a two-step process, and involves a partially folded state stabilized at acidic pH. An evident role for the interaction of apomyoglobin with lipid bilayers would be to facilitate the uptake of heme from the outer mitochondrial membrane. However, heme binding to apomyoglobin is observed at neutral pH when the protein remains in solution, and slows down as the pH becomes more favorable to membrane interactions. The effective incorporation of soluble heme into apomyoglobin at neutral pH suggests that the interaction of apomyoglobin with membranes is not necessary for the heme uptake from the lipid bilayer. In vivo, however, the ability of apomyoglobin to interact with membrane may facilitate its localization in the vicinity of the mitochondrial membranes, and so may increase the yield of heme uptake. Moreover, the behavior of apomyoglobin in the presence of membranes shows striking similarities with that of other proteins with a globin fold. This suggests that the globin fold is well adapted for soluble proteins whose functions require interactions with membranes.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17242377