Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Endocrine

Interactions between adenohypophyseal, hypothalamic and nasal presumptive territories during early neurulation process

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Endocrine - 01 May 1995

Elamraoui A, Berghman LR, Dubois PM

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 21153185

Endocrine 1995 May;3(5):335-43

In chick embryo, the adenohypophysis shows close morphological relationships with hypothalamic and nasal presumptive territories. However, we do not know how long the adenohypophysis depends on its surrounding tissues for its development and differentiation nor do we know anything about factors and mechanisms invovled. This study was undertaken to investigate whether any interactions between these neighbouring tissues influence adenohypophyseal cell growth and differentiation. The ablation of the presumptive hypothalamus and neurohypophysis results in the failure of hypothalamic and infundibular process development. However, the adenohypophysis was present, although it was drastically modified. Moreover, gonadotrophs and corticotrophs can be detected in the developing adenohypophyseal tissue. After the ablation of nasal presumptive territory, from where GnRH neurons originate, the adenohypophyseal length and the number of gonadatrophs and corticotrophs are not significantly altered when compared to control embryos. These results suggest that the presumptive hypothalamus and neurohypophysis are committed during open neural stage. At the following stages, these territories may act to promote the future adenohypophysis development and morphogenesis. However, it seems that pituitary cells are committed from the very early embryonic stages, but interactions between the presumptive adenohypophysis and adjacent territories before the open neural stage cannot be ruled out.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21153185