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© Antoinette Ryter
Serratia marcescens avec présence de flagelles (cils) péritriches. Famille des Enterobacteriaceae, bacille à Gram négatif, non sporulé, anaérobie facultatif, mobile, parfois encapsulé, pouvant synthétiser un pigment rouge ou rose. Présent dans les végétaux , le sol, et l'eau. A l'origine d'infections nosocomiales et résistant à de nombreux antibiotiques. Image colorisée.
Publication : Current opinion in immunology

Innate and adaptive immunity in bacteria: mechanisms of programmed genetic variation to fight bacteriophages

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Current opinion in immunology - 11 Nov 2011

Bikard D, Marraffini LA

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 22079134

Curr. Opin. Immunol. 2012 Feb;24(1):15-20

Bacteria are constantly challenged by bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria), the most abundant microorganism on earth. Bacteria have evolved a variety of immunity mechanisms to resist bacteriophage infection. In response, bacteriophages can evolve counter-resistance mechanisms and launch a ‘virus versus host’ evolutionary arms race. In this context, rapid evolution is fundamental for the survival of the bacterial cell. Programmed genetic variation mechanisms at loci involved in immunity against bacteriophages generate diversity at a much faster rate than random point mutation and enable bacteria to quickly adapt and repel infection. Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) and phase variation mechanisms enhance the generic (innate) immune response against bacteriophages. On the other hand, the integration of small bacteriophage sequences in CRISPR loci provide bacteria with a virus-specific and sequence-specific adaptive immune response. Therefore, although using different molecular mechanisms, both prokaryotes and higher organisms rely on programmed genetic variation to increase genetic diversity and fight rapidly evolving infectious agents.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22079134