Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Emmanuel Lemichez
Microscopy image showing the formation of large tunnels in a blood vessel endothelial cell induced by a group of bacterial toxins
Publication : Scientific reports

Identification of cancer-associated missense mutations in hace1 that impair cell growth control and Rac1 ubiquitylation

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Scientific reports - 20 Mar 2017

Andrio E, Lotte R, Hamaoui D, Cherfils J, Doye A, Daugaard M, Sorensen PH, Bost F, Ruimy R, Mettouchi A, Lemichez E

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 28317937

Sci Rep 2017 Mar;7:44779

The E3 ubiquitin ligase HACE1 is a potent tumor suppressor that controls cell proliferation and ubiquitylates the small GTPase Rac1 to target it to proteasomal degradation. Whether and how the activity of HACE1 is regulated by the N-terminal ankyrin (ANK) and the middle (MID) domains is ill defined. Here, we identified in the version 64 of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) 13 missense mutations of hace1 located outside the HECT domain, and found that all lead to defective control of cell proliferation. In addition, several mutations located in the ankyrin domain displayed a dramatic reduction in Rac1 ubiquitylation associated with a decrease of colony formation in soft agar. 3D structure modelling of the 7 ankyrin-repeats coupled to functional analysis identified a surface epitope centered on one of the mutated residue, Gly-175, which is critical for controlling Rac1 binding and ubiquitylation. We also identified a role for the MID domain in conferring the specificity of association of HACE1 to the active form of Rac1. Our study of the functional interplay between HACE1 and Rac1 in cancer thus sheds a new light on the molecular mechanism of Rac1 ubiquitylation by HACE1 and the impact of its cancer-associated mutations in cell proliferation.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28317937