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© Research
Publication : The Journal of infectious diseases

HTLV-2B strains, similar to those found in several Amerindian tribes, are endemic in central African Bakola Pygmies

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Journal of infectious diseases - 01 May 2011

Mauclère P, Afonso PV, Meertens L, Plancoulaine S, Calattini S, Froment A, Van Beveren M, de Thé G, Quintana-Murci L, Mahieux R, Gessain A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 21459818

J. Infect. Dis. 2011 May;203(9):1316-23

BACKGROUND: The presence and origin of endemic foci of human T-lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV2) infection in Africa remain a matter of debate.

METHODS: To better appreciate such determinants, we performed a survey of 1918 inhabitants from Cameroon forest areas, including 1051 Bakola Pygmies and 867 Bantus.

RESULTS: The overall HTLV-1/2 seroprevalence was 4% (49 cases of HTLV-1 and 27 cases of HTLV-2 infection). Both infections were mainly restricted to the Bakola Pygmies, with surprisingly no HTLV-2 infections in the Bantu population. Both HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 seroprevalences increased with age. There was evidence of ongoing HTLV-2 transmission in this population. Lymphoid T cell lines producing HTLV-2 were established. HTLV-2 long terminal repeat sequences (672 base pairs) obtained from 7 infected Bakola were highly similar to each other (<1% nucleotide divergence), as well as to Amerindian HTLV-2B strains. Analyses on a complete sequence (8954 base pairs) confirmed that it was a typical HTLV-2 subtype B strain. Along with molecular clock analysis, these data strongly suggest that HTLV-2 has been endemic in the Bakola Pygmy population for a long time.

CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates clearly an HTLV-2 endemicity with ongoing transmission in an African population. Furthermore, it give insights into central questions regarding the origins and evolution rate of HTLV-2 and the migrations of infected populations.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21459818