Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Therese Couderc, Marc Lecuit
Publication : Vaccine

Heterologous prime-boost immunization with live attenuated B. pertussis BPZE1 followed by acellular pertussis vaccine in mice

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Vaccine - 17 Jun 2014

Feunou PF, Kammoun H, Debrie AS, Locht C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 24950361

Vaccine 2014 Jul;32(34):4281-8

Pertussis is a severe and life-threatening infectious disease. Two successive generations of vaccines have strongly reduced its incidence over the last 70 years. However, despite excellent global vaccine coverage, it is still not under control and constitutes today the most frequent vaccine-preventable childhood disease. New vaccination approaches are therefore needed. Here, we provide preclinical proof of concept for a heterologous prime-boost strategy, using the live attenuated Bordetella pertussis vaccine candidate BPZE1 to prime infant and neonatal mice intranasally and a currently available acellular pertussis vaccine (aPV) as a booster. Intranasal vaccination with BPZE1 provided strong protection against challenge in neonatal mice, which could be boosted with a single dose of aPV. Furthermore, BPZE1 priming induced a strong Th1/Th17 response, which was maintained after repeated aPV administrations, in contrast to non-primed mice, in which aPV administrations resulted in Th2 skewing. In addition to T cell responses, intranasal administration of BPZE1 to infant or neonatal mice also primed antibody responses to B. pertussis antigens, with a strong preference of the IgG2a over the IgG1 isotypes, which was not seen in non-primed animals. Finally, neonatal BPZE1 priming strongly enhanced aPV-induced protection against B. pertussis challenge. These results lend support for a heterologous prime-boost strategy to control pertussis by using BPZE1 early in life and considering the current aPV administrations as booster vaccinations, thereby bridging the gap from birth to the first aPV immunizations and avoiding aPV-mediated Th2 skewing. A first-in-man clinical trial on BPZE1 has recently been successfully completed, which provides hope that these findings may be translated into human applications in the future.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24950361