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© A-M. Pais-Correia, M-I. Thoulouze, A. Alcover, A. Gessain
Mise en évidence de structures de type "biofilm ", formées par le rétrovirus HTLV-1 générés par des cellules infectées (cellules du haut), qui ont été transmis à un autre lymphocyte (cellule du bas). Micrographie en microscopie électronique à balayage. Image colorisée.
Publication : Journal of virology

Northern African strains of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 arose from a recombination event

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of virology - 18 Jun 2014

Desrames A, Cassar O, Gout O, Hermine O, Taylor GP, Afonso PV, Gessain A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 24942582

J. Virol. 2014 Sep;88(17):9782-8

UNLABELLED: Although recombination is a major source of genetic variability in retroviruses, no recombinant strain had been observed for human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the first isolated human-pathogenic retrovirus. Different genotypes exist for HTLV-1: Genotypes b and d to g are restricted to central Africa, while genotype c is only endemic in Australo-Melanesia. In contrast, the cosmopolitan genotype a is widely distributed. We applied a combination of phylogenetics and recombination analysis approaches to a set of new HTLV-1 sequences, which we collected from 19 countries throughout Africa, the continent where the virus has the largest endemic presence. This led us to demonstrate the presence of recombinants in HTLV-1. Indeed, the HTLV-1 strains currently present in North Africa have originated from a recombinant event between strains from Senegal and West Africa. This recombination is estimated to have occurred around 4,000 years ago. This recombination seems to have been generated during reverse transcription. In conclusion, we demonstrate that, albeit rare, recombination can occur in HTLV-1 and may play a role in the evolution of this retrovirus.

IMPORTANCE: A number of HTLV-1 subtypes have been described in different populations, but none of the genetic differences between these subtypes have been ascribed to recombination events. Here we report an HTLV-1 recombinant virus among infected individuals in North Africa. This demonstrates that, contrary to what was thought, recombination can occur and could play a role in the evolution of HTLV-1.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24942582