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© Institut Pasteur et Institut Imagine
Scanning electron micrograph of segmented filamentous bacterium (SFB). Segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) are bacteria from the Clostridiaceae family that colonize the intestines of many species, likely including humans, without causing disease; they live in symbiosis with epithelial cells and are involved in the maturation of intestinal immunity.
Publication : Cell reports

H3K4me1 Supports Memory-like NK Cells Induced by Systemic Inflammation

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Cell reports - 17 Dec 2019

Rasid O, Chevalier C, Camarasa TM, Fitting C, Cavaillon JM, Hamon MA

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 31851924

Cell Rep 2019 Dec;29(12):3933-3945.e3

Natural killer (NK) cells are unique players in innate immunity and, as such, an attractive target for immunotherapy. NK cells display immune memory properties in certain models, but the long-term status of NK cells following systemic inflammation is unknown. Here we show that following LPS-induced endotoxemia in mice, NK cells acquire cell-intrinsic memory-like properties, showing increased production of IFNγ upon specific secondary stimulation. The NK cell memory response is detectable for at least 9 weeks and contributes to protection from E. coli infection upon adoptive transfer. Importantly, we reveal a mechanism essential for NK cell memory, whereby an H3K4me1-marked latent enhancer is uncovered at the ifng locus. Chemical inhibition of histone methyltransferase activity erases the enhancer and abolishes NK cell memory. Thus, NK cell memory develops after endotoxemia in a histone methylation-dependent manner, ensuring a heightened response to secondary stimulation.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31851924