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© Andres Alcover
Scanning electron microscopy showing a conjugate formed between a T lymphocyte and an antigen presenting cell. It is worth noting the long shape of the T cell (Tc) polarized towards the antigen presenting cell (APC) and the membrane protrusions that adhere the T lymphocyte to the antigen presenting cell.
Publication : PLoS pathogens

Group Selection and Contribution of Minority Variants during Virus Adaptation Determines Virus Fitness and Phenotype

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in PLoS pathogens - 05 May 2015

Bordería AV, Isakov O, Moratorio G, Henningsson R, Agüera-González S, Organtini L, Gnädig NF, Blanc H, Alcover A, Hafenstein S, Fontes M, Shomron N, Vignuzzi M

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 25941809

PLoS Pathog. 2015 May;11(5):e1004838

Understanding how a pathogen colonizes and adapts to a new host environment is a primary aim in studying emerging infectious diseases. Adaptive mutations arise among the thousands of variants generated during RNA virus infection, and identifying these variants will shed light onto how changes in tropism and species jumps can occur. Here, we adapted Coxsackie virus B3 to a highly permissive and less permissive environment. Using deep sequencing and bioinformatics, we identified a multi-step adaptive process to adaptation involving residues in the receptor footprints that correlated with receptor availability and with increase in virus fitness in an environment-specific manner. We show that adaptation occurs by selection of a dominant mutation followed by group selection of minority variants that together, confer the fitness increase observed in the population, rather than selection of a single dominant genotype.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25941809