Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Global analysis of mutations driving microevolution of a heterozygous diploid fungal pathogen

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - 01 Jan 2018

Ene IV, Farrer RA, Hirakawa MP, Agwamba K, Cuomo CA, Bennett RJ

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 30150418

Link to DOI – 10.1073/pnas.1806002115

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2018 09; 115(37): E8688-E8697

Candida albicans is a heterozygous diploid yeast that is a commensal of the human gastrointestinal tract and a prevalent opportunistic pathogen. Here, whole-genome sequencing was performed on multiple C. albicans isolates passaged both in vitro and in vivo to characterize the complete spectrum of mutations arising in laboratory culture and in the mammalian host. We establish that, independent of culture niche, microevolution is primarily driven by de novo base substitutions and frequent short-tract loss-of-heterozygosity events. An average base-substitution rate of ∼1.2 × 10-10 per base pair per generation was observed in vitro, with higher rates inferred during host infection. Large-scale chromosomal changes were relatively rare, although chromosome 7 trisomies frequently emerged during passaging in a gastrointestinal model and was associated with increased fitness for this niche. Multiple chromosomal features impacted mutational patterns, with mutation rates elevated in repetitive regions, subtelomeric regions, and in gene families encoding cell surface proteins involved in host adhesion. Strikingly, de novo mutation rates were more than 800-fold higher in regions immediately adjacent to emergent loss-of-heterozygosity tracts, indicative of recombination-induced mutagenesis. Furthermore, genomes showed biased patterns of mutations suggestive of extensive purifying selection during passaging. These results reveal how both cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic factors influence C. albicans microevolution, and provide a quantitative picture of genome dynamics in this heterozygous diploid species.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30150418