Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Scientific Reports

Exposure to selenomethionine causes selenocysteine misincorporation and protein aggregation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Scientific Reports - 17 Mar 2017

Pierre Plateau, Cosmin Saveanu, Roxane Lestini, Marc Dauplais, Laurence Decourty, Alain Jacquier, Sylvain Blanquet & Myriam Lazard

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 28303947

Sci. Rep. 2017 Mar 17;7:44761. doi: 10.1038/srep44761

Selenomethionine, a dietary supplement with beneficial health effects, becomes toxic if taken in excess. To gain insight into the mechanisms of action of selenomethionine, we screened a collection of ≈5900 Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants for sensitivity or resistance to growth-limiting amounts of the compound. Genes involved in protein degradation and synthesis were enriched in the obtained datasets, suggesting that selenomethionine causes a proteotoxic stress. We demonstrate that selenomethionine induces an accumulation of protein aggregates by a mechanism that requires de novo protein synthesis. Reduction of translation rates was accompanied by a decrease of protein aggregation and of selenomethionine toxicity. Protein aggregation was supressed in a ∆cys3 mutant unable to synthetize selenocysteine, suggesting that aggregation results from the metabolization of selenomethionine to selenocysteine followed by translational incorporation in the place of cysteine. In support of this mechanism, we were able to detect random substitutions of cysteinyl residues by selenocysteine in a reporter protein. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of toxicity that may have implications in higher eukaryotes.

http://www.nature.com/articles/srep44761