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© Institut Pasteur/Antoinette Ryter
Salmonella spp. Bactéries à Gram négatif, aérobies ou anaérobies facultatifs à transmission orofécale. Les salmonelles majeures (sérotype typhi et sérotype paratyphi) sont responsables des fièvres typhoïde et paratyphoïde chez l'homme uniquement ; les salmonelles mineures (sérotype typhimurium et sérotype enteritidis) sont impliquées dans 30 à 60 % des gastroentérites et toxiinfections d'origine alimentaire. Image colorisée.
Publication : Presse médicale (Paris, France : 1983)

[Enterohemorragic Escherichia coli (EHEC): topical enterobacteriaceae]

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Presse médicale (Paris, France : 1983) - 10 Dec 2012

Gouali M, Weill FX

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 23237787

Presse Med 2013 Jan;42(1):68-75

Since the 1980s, EnterohaemorrhagicEscherichia coli (EHEC) have been recognised as emergent pathogens causing foodborne outbreaks. The latest one is the E. coli O104:H4 outbreak which occurred in Germany in May 2011 then in France. In France, the surveillance of EHEC infections is based on surveillance of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) in children under 15 years old. The average annual incidence is 0.8/100,000 children under 15 years old with a predominance of the O157:H7 serotype. EHEC are one of the six clinical pathovars of E. coli defined by their capacity to produce Shiga-toxins and for that reason, are part of a larger group called: Shigatoxin-producingE. coli (STEC). EHEC are a cause of different troubles ranging from mild diarrhea to haemorrhagic colitis which might be complicated by HUS in young children and thrombocytopenic thrombotic purpura in adults. The reservoir of EHEC is mainly the intestinal tract of ruminants: EHEC are transmitted via ingestion of contaminated food or water, person-to-person contact, direct animal contact and exposure to the environment. The diagnosis of the EHEC infections relies on isolation of STEC in stool samples or detection of genes encoding for Shiga-toxins. Treatment is mainly symptomatic. Use of antibiotics is controversial because the risk of HUS could be increased (release of toxins).

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23237787