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© Uwe Maskos
Tranche d'hippocampe de souris colorée avec deux toxines spécifiques de sous-types de récepteur nicotinique, en rouge (grains), et en vert (corps cellulaires). L'hippocampe est la zone du cerveau qui gère la mémoire spatiale.
Publication : Aging

Early and progressive deficit of neuronal activity patterns in a model of local amyloid pathology in mouse prefrontal cortex.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Aging - 20 Dec 2016

Koukouli F, Rooy M, Maskos U,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 27999185

Link to DOI [DOI] – 10.18632/aging.101136

Aging (Albany NY) 2016 12; 8(12): 3430-3449

Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The condition predominantly affects the cerebral cortex and hippocampus and is characterized by the spread of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). But soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers have also been identified to accumulate in the brains of AD patients and correlate with cognitive dysfunction more than the extent of plaque deposition. Here, we developed an adeno-associated viral vector expressing the human mutated amyloid precursor protein (AAV-hAPP). Intracranial injection of the AAV into the prefrontal cortex (PFC) allowed the induction of AD-like deficits in adult mice, thereby modelling human pathology. AAV-hAPP expression caused accumulation of Aβ oligomers, microglial activation, astrocytosis and the gradual formation of amyloid plaques and NFTs. In vivo two-photon imaging revealed an increase in neuronal activity, a dysfunction characteristic of the pathology, already during the accumulation of soluble oligomers. Importantly, we found that Aβ disrupts the synchronous spontaneous activity of neurons in PFC that, as in humans, is characterized by ultraslow fluctuation patterns. Our work allowed us to track brain activity changes during disease progression and provides new insight into the early deficits of synchronous ongoing brain activity, the “default network”, in the presence of Aβ peptide.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27999185