Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Journal of cell science

Distance between homologous chromosomes results from chromosome positioning constraints.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of cell science - 01 Dec 2010

Heride C, Ricoul M, Kiêu K, von Hase J, Guillemot V, Cremer C, Dubrana K, Sabatier L,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 21084563

Link to DOI – 10.1242/jcs.066498

J Cell Sci 2010 Dec; 123(Pt 23): 4063-75

The organization of chromosomes is important for various biological processes and is involved in the formation of rearrangements often observed in cancer. In mammals, chromosomes are organized in territories that are radially positioned in the nucleus. However, it remains unclear whether chromosomes are organized relative to each other. Here, we examine the nuclear arrangement of 10 chromosomes in human epithelial cancer cells by three-dimensional FISH analysis. We show that their radial position correlates with the ratio of their gene density to chromosome size. We also observe that inter-homologue distances are generally larger than inter-heterologue distances. Using numerical simulations taking radial position constraints into account, we demonstrate that, for some chromosomes, radial position is enough to justify the inter-homologue distance, whereas for others additional constraints are involved. Among these constraints, we propose that nucleolar organizer regions participate in the internal positioning of the acrocentric chromosome HSA21, possibly through interactions with nucleoli. Maintaining distance between homologous chromosomes in human cells could participate in regulating genome stability and gene expression, both mechanisms that are key players in tumorigenesis.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21084563