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© Artur Scherf
Scanning Electron Microscopy of Red Blood Cell infected by Plasmodium falciparum.
Publication : Journal of cell science

Differential association of Orc1 and Sir2 proteins to telomeric domains in Plasmodium falciparum

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of cell science - 15 Jun 2008

Mancio-Silva L, Rojas-Meza AP, Vargas M, Scherf A, Hernandez-Rivas R

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 18525026

J. Cell. Sci. 2008 Jun;121(Pt 12):2046-53

Telomeres have the capacity to recruit proteins that facilitate the spreading of heterochromatin into subtelomeric DNA regions. In the human protozoan pathogen Plasmodium falciparum, the telomere-associated protein Sir2 has been shown to control the silencing of members of virulence genes at some, but not all, chromosome-end loci, indicating that additional proteins are involved in telomere position effect. Here, we identified, in P. falciparum, a novel telomere-associated protein that displays homology with the origin-of-recognition-complex 1 protein Orc1. Antibodies raised against this P. falciparum protein localized to telomeric clusters in the nuclear periphery and the nucleolus. It was found that, prior to DNA replication, P. falciparum Orc1 and Sir2 undergo drastic subcellular reorganization, such as dissociation from the telomere cluster and spreading into the nucleus and parasite cytoplasm. Relocation of Orc1 and Sir2 was also linked to the partial dissociation of telomere clusters. Super gel-shift and chromatin-immunoprecipitation experiments showed the physical association of Orc1 with telomere repeats but revealed a differential association with adjacent non-coding repeat DNA elements. Our data suggest that Plasmodium telomeres might fold back and that Orc1 cooperates with Sir2 in telomeric silencing.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18525026