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© Xavier Montagutelli, Institut Pasteur
Publication : Genetics

Centimorgan-range one-step mapping of fertility traits using interspecific recombinant congenic mice.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Genetics - 01 Jul 2007

L'Hôte D, Serres C, Laissue P, Oulmouden A, Rogel-Gaillard C, Montagutelli X, Vaiman D,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 17483418

Genetics 2007 Jul; 176(3): 1907-21

In mammals, male fertility is a quantitative feature determined by numerous genes. Until now, several wide chromosomal regions involved in fertility have been defined by genetic mapping approaches; unfortunately, the underlying genes are very difficult to identify. Here, 53 interspecific recombinant congenic mouse strains (IRCSs) bearing 1-2% SEG/Pas (Mus spretus) genomic fragments disseminated in a C57Bl/6J (Mus domesticus) background were used to systematically analyze male fertility parameters. One of the most prominent advantages of this model is the possibility of analyzing stable phenotypes in living animals. Here, we demonstrate the possibility in one-step fine mapping for several fertility traits. Focusing on strains harboring a unique spretus fragment, we could unambiguously localize two testis and one prostate weight-regulating QTL (Ltw1, Ltw2, and Lpw1), four QTL controlling the sperm nucleus shape (Sh1, Sh2, Sh3, and Sh4), and one QTL influencing sperm survival (Dss1). In several cases, the spretus DNA fragment was small enough to propose sound candidates. For instance, Spata1, Capza, and Tuba7 are very strong candidates for influencing the shape of the sperm head. Identifying new genes implied in mammalian fertility pathways is a necessary prerequisite for clarifying their molecular grounds and for proposing diagnostic tools for masculine infertilities.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17483418