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© Fabrice Chrétien with Ultrapole, colorized by Jean-Marc Panaud
Cellule souche (en jaune) de muscle squelettique partiellement recouverte par la membrane basale, migrant sur une fibre musculaire (en bleu).
Publication : Intensive care medicine

Blood glucose level and outcome after cardiac arrest: insights from a large registry in the hypothermia era

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Intensive care medicine - 25 Mar 2014

Daviaud F, Dumas F, Demars N, Geri G, Bouglé A, Morichau-Beauchant T, Nguyen YL, Bougouin W, Pène F, Charpentier J, Cariou A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 24664154

Intensive Care Med 2014 Jun;40(6):855-62

INTRODUCTION: The influence of blood glucose (BG) level during the post-resuscitation period after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is still debated. To evaluate the relationship between blood glucose level and outcome, we included the median glycemia and its maximal amplitude over the first 48 h following ICU admission in an analysis of outcome predictors.

METHODS: We conducted a database study in a cardiac arrest center in Paris, France. Between 2006 and 2010, we included 381 patients who were all resuscitated from an OHCA. A moderate glycemic control was applied in all patients. The median glycemia and the largest change over the first 48 h were included in a multivariate analysis that was performed to determine parameters associated with a favorable outcome.

RESULTS: Of the 381 patients, 136 (36 %) had a favorable outcome (CPC 1-2). Median BG level was 7.6 mmol/L (6.3-9.8) in patients with a favorable outcome compared to 9.0 mmol/L (IQR 7.1-10.6) for patients with an unfavorable outcome (p < 0.01). Median BG level variation was 7.1 (4.2-11) and 9.6 (5.9-13.6) mmol/L in patients with and without a favorable outcome, respectively (p < 0.01). In multivariate analysis, an increased median BG level over the first 48 h was found to be an independent predictor of poor issue [OR = 0.43; 95 % CI (0.24-0.78), p = 0.006]. Finally a progressive increase in median BG level was associated with a progressive increase in the proportion of patients with a poor outcome.

CONCLUSION: We observed a relationship between high blood glucose level and outcome after cardiac arrest. These results suggest the need to test a strategy combining both control of glycemia and minimization of glycemic variations for its ability to improve post-resuscitation care.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24664154