Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Frontiers in bioengineering and biotechnology

Biophysical Control of Bile Duct Epithelial Morphogenesis in Natural and Synthetic Scaffolds

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Frontiers in bioengineering and biotechnology - 13 Dec 2019

Funfak A, Bouzhir L, Gontran E, Minier N, Dupuis-Williams P, Gobaa S

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 31921820

Front Bioeng Biotechnol 2019;7:417

The integration of bile duct epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) in artificial liver culture systems is important in order to generate more physiologically relevant liver models. Understanding the role of the cellular microenvironment on differentiation, physiology, and organogenesis of cholangiocytes into functional biliary tubes is essential for the development of new liver therapies, notably in the field of cholangiophaties. In this study, we investigated the role of natural or synthetic scaffolds on cholangiocytes cyst growth, lumen formation and polarization. We demonstrated that cholangiocyte cyst formation efficiency can be similar between natural and synthetic matrices provided that the mechanical properties of the hydrogels are matched. When using synthetic matrices, we also tried to understand the impact of elasticity, matrix metalloprotease-mediated degradation and integrin ligand density on cyst morphogenesis. We demonstrated that hydrogel stiffness regulates cyst formation. We found that controlling integrin ligand density was key in the establishment of large polarized cysts of cholangiocytes. The mechanism of lumen formation was found to rely on cell self-organization and proliferation. The formed cholangiocyte organoids showed a good MDR1 (multi drug resistance protein) transport activity. Our study highlights the advantages of fully synthetic scaffold as a tool to develop bile duct models.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31921820