Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Deriano Lab / Institut Pasteur
Chromosomes métaphasiques d’une cellule lymphoïde cancéreuse présentant une amplification des gènes Igh et c-myc
Publication : The Lancet. Oncology

B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: a polymorphic family unified by genomic features

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Lancet. Oncology - 01 Aug 2003

Guipaud O, Deriano L, Salin H, Vallat L, Sabatier L, Merle-Béral H, Delic J

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 12901966

Lancet Oncol. 2003 Aug;4(8):505-14

Human cancer is characterised by complex molecular aberrations which result in a wide variety of clinical manifestations. B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) is particularly diverse, both in terms of molecular changes and clinical course, and consequently our understanding of the pathology of this disease is generally poor. Furthermore, the heterogeneity of this tumour type coupled with the absence of an obvious genetic “hallmark”, such as gain of oncogene function or loss of suppressor-gene function, has led many investigators to question whether B-CLL is a single disease entity. In most cases, B-CLL does not show specific reciprocal chromosomal translocations as found in other haemopoietic malignant diseases. The genomic instability of B-CLL results in numerous different types of chromosomal losses and gains, giving rise to unsettled karyotypes among individuals with this disease. Nevertheless, genetic data imply that B-CLL is a single disease characterised by a common gene-expression profile and by the existence of specific subtypes that may have clinical correlates in patients.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12901966