Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Therese Couderc, Marc Lecuit
Publication : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Autophagy is required for endothelial cell alignment and atheroprotection under physiological blood flow

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - 25 Sep 2017

Vion AC, Kheloufi M, Hammoutene A, Poisson J, Lasselin J, Devue C, Pic I, Dupont N, Busse J, Stark K, Lafaurie-Janvore J, Barakat AI, Loyer X, Souyri M, Viollet B, Julia P, Tedgui A, Codogno P, Boulanger CM, Rautou PE

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 28973855

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2017 Oct;114(41):E8675-E8684

It has been known for some time that atherosclerotic lesions preferentially develop in areas exposed to low SS and are characterized by a proinflammatory, apoptotic, and senescent endothelial phenotype. Conversely, areas exposed to high SS are protected from plaque development, but the mechanisms have remained elusive. Autophagy is a protective mechanism that allows recycling of defective organelles and proteins to maintain cellular homeostasis. We aimed to understand the role of endothelial autophagy in the atheroprotective effect of high SS. Atheroprotective high SS stimulated endothelial autophagic flux in human and murine arteries. On the contrary, endothelial cells exposed to atheroprone low SS were characterized by inefficient autophagy as a result of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation, AMPKα inhibition, and blockade of the autophagic flux. In hypercholesterolemic mice, deficiency in endothelial autophagy increased plaque burden only in the atheroresistant areas exposed to high SS; plaque size was unchanged in atheroprone areas, in which endothelial autophagy flux is already blocked. In cultured cells and in transgenic mice, deficiency in endothelial autophagy was characterized by defects in endothelial alignment with flow direction, a hallmark of endothelial cell health. This effect was associated with an increase in endothelial apoptosis and senescence in high-SS regions. Deficiency in endothelial autophagy also increased TNF-α-induced inflammation under high-SS conditions and decreased expression of the antiinflammatory factor KLF-2. Altogether, these results show that adequate endothelial autophagic flux under high SS limits atherosclerotic plaque formation by preventing endothelial apoptosis, senescence, and inflammation.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28973855