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© Research
Publication : Journal of clinical microbiology

Automated ribotyping of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of clinical microbiology - 01 Jun 2002

Brisse S, Fussing V, Ridwan B, Verhoef J, Willems RJ

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 12037051

J. Clin. Microbiol. 2002 Jun;40(6):1977-84

Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF) strains represent an important threat in hospital infections in the United States and are found at high frequencies in both the community and farm animals in Europe. We evaluated automated ribotyping for interlaboratory reproducibility by using the restriction enzymes EcoRI and BamHI and compared ribotyping to both amplification of fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to assess its discriminatory power and capacity for the identification of epidemiologically important strains. Of 19 (EcoRI) and 16 (BamHI) isolates tested in duplicate in two laboratories, 18 (95%) and 16 (100%), respectively, showed reproducible ribotypes. These high reproducibility rates were obtained only after manual refinement of the automated fingerprint analysis. A group of 49 VREF strains initially selected to represent 32 distinct AFLP types were separated into 28 EcoRI ribotypes, 25 BamHI ribotypes, and 28 sequence types. Ribotyping with EcoRI and BamHI was able to discern the host-specific genogroups recently disclosed by AFLP typing and MLST and to distinguish most strains containing the esp gene, a marker specific for strains causing hospital outbreaks. An expandable ribotype identification library was created. We recommend EcoRI as the enzyme of choice for automated ribotyping of VREF strains. Given the high level of discrimination of VREF strains, the high rate of interlaboratory reproducibility, and the potential for the identification of epidemiologically important genotypes, automated ribotyping appears to be a very valuable approach for characterizing VREF strains.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12037051