Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : BMC microbiology

Automated discovery and phylogenetic analysis of new toxin-antitoxin systems

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in BMC microbiology - 25 Jun 2008

Guglielmini J, Szpirer C, Milinkovitch MC

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 18578869

BMC Microbiol. 2008;8:104

BACKGROUND: Although often viewed as elements “at the service of” bacteria, plasmids exhibit replication and maintenance mechanisms that make them purely “selfish DNA” candidates. Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are a spectacular example of such mechanisms: a gene coding for a cytotoxic stable protein is preceded by a gene coding for an unstable antitoxin. The toxin being more stable than the antitoxin, absence of the operon causes a reduction of the amount of the latter relative to the amount of the former. Thus, a cell exhibiting a TA system on a plasmid is ‘condemned’ either not to loose it or to die.

RESULTS: Different TA systems have been described and classified in several families, according to similarity and functional parameters. However, given the small size and large divergence among TA system sequences, it is likely that many TA systems are not annotated as such in the rapidly accumulating NCBI database. To detect these putative TA systems, we developed an algorithm that searches public databases on the basis of predefined similarity and TA-specific structural constraints. This approach, using a single starting query sequence for each of the ParE, Doc, and VapC families, and two starting sequences for the MazF/CcdB family, identified over 1,500 putative TA systems. These groups of sequences were analyzed phylogenetically for a better classification and understanding of TA systems evolution.

CONCLUSION: The phylogenetic distributions of the newly uncovered TA systems are very different within the investigated families. The resulting phylogenetic trees are available for browsing and searching through a java program available at http://ueg.ulb.ac.be/tiq/.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18578869