Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Fabrice Chrétien with Ultrapole, colorized by Jean-Marc Panaud
Cellule souche (en jaune) de muscle squelettique partiellement recouverte par la membrane basale, migrant sur une fibre musculaire (en bleu).
Publication : Annales françaises d'anesthèsie et de rèanimation

[ICU-acquired neuromyopathy, delirium and sedation in intensive care unit]

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Annales françaises d'anesthèsie et de rèanimation - 26 Jun 2008

Sharshar T

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 18584998

Ann Fr Anesth Reanim 2008 Jul-Aug;27(7-8):617-22

ICU-acquired neuromyopathy (NMAR) and delirium are the two most frequent and severe neurological complications of intensive care medicine. Their mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. The objective of this review is to address the potential role of sedation in occurrence of these complications. There is no evidence that sedation is involved in NMARs. However, the hypothesis that muscle inactivity induced by sedation fosters NMAR is an argument to discontinue or reduce sedatives infusion whenever possible. It is also recommended not to administer propofol more than 48 h at an infusion rate above 5 mg/kg per hour in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, because of the risk of propofol infusion syndrome, which includes notably rhabdomyolysis. The relationship between delirium and sedation are controversial because in most studies, patients were considered delirious though being still sedated and multivariate analysis was lacking. One study showed that lorazepam given continuously was an independent risk factor for daily transition to delirium 24 h later with a 20% increase risk of every unit dose (expressed as log(e)mg). The impact of deepness, daily interruption or titration of sedation on the prevalence of delirium has never been assessed but it seems that deep sedation has to be avoided.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18584998