Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Journal of wound care

Adhesion of the ulcerative pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans to DACC-coated dressings

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of wound care - 01 Aug 2014

Geroult S, Phillips RO, Demangel C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 25139600

J Wound Care 2014 Aug;23(8):417-8, 422-4

OBJECTIVE: Mycobacterium ulcerans is the causative agent of Buruli ulcer disease, the third most common mycobacteriosis after tuberculosis and leprosy and an emerging public health threat in sub-Saharan Africa. The bacteria produce a diffusible cytotoxin called mycolactone, which triggers the formation of necrotic lesions in cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues. The principal aim of this study was to characterise the cell surface hydrophobicity of Mycobacterium ulcerans and determine if bacteria bind to dialkyl carbamoyl chloride (DACC)-coated dressings through hydrophobic interactions in vitro. Since mycolactone displays hydrophobic groups, a secondary aim was to compare mycolactone binding to hydrophobic and standard dressings.

METHODS: We used hydrophobic interaction chromatography to evaluate the cell surface hydrophobicity of Mycobacterium ulcerans, compared to that of other microorganisms colonising wounds. The binding of Mycobacterium ulcerans bacteria to DACC-coated and control dressings was then assessed quantitatively by measurement of microbial adenosine triphosphate (ATP), while that of mycolactone was evaluated by fluorescence spectroscopy.

RESULTS: Compared to Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium ulcerans displayed the highest cell surface hydrophobicity, irrespective of the bacterial production of mycolactone. Mycobacterium ulcerans bacteria bound to DACC-coated dressings [corrected] better than untreated controls. Mycolactone did not bind stably to hydrophobic, nor standard dressings, in the conditions tested.

CONCLUSION: Retention of Mycobacterium ulcerans and other wound pathogens to DACC-coated dressings may help reduce the bacterial load in Buruli ulcers and thereby improve healing. Dressings efficiently capturing mycolactone may bring an additional clinical benefit, by accelerating the elimination of the toxin during the course of antibiotic treatment.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25139600