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© Research
Publication : Brain : a journal of neurology

Adaptive human immunity drives remyelination in a mouse model of demyelination.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Brain : a journal of neurology - 01 Apr 2017

El Behi M, Sanson C, Bachelin C, Guillot-Noël L, Fransson J, Stankoff B, Maillart E, Sarrazin N, Guillemot V, Abdi H, Cournu-Rebeix I, Fontaine B, Zujovic V,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 28334918

Link to DOI – 10.1093/brain/awx008

Brain 2017 Apr; 140(4): 967-980

One major challenge in multiple sclerosis is to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to disease severity progression. The recently demonstrated correlation between disease severity and remyelination emphasizes the importance of identifying factors leading to a favourable outcome. Why remyelination fails or succeeds in multiple sclerosis patients remains largely unknown, mainly because remyelination has never been studied within a humanized pathological context that would recapitulate major events in plaque formation such as infiltration of inflammatory cells. Therefore, we developed a new paradigm by grafting healthy donor or multiple sclerosis patient lymphocytes in the demyelinated lesion of nude mice spinal cord. We show that lymphocytes play a major role in remyelination whose efficacy is significantly decreased in mice grafted with multiple sclerosis lymphocytes compared to those grafted with healthy donors lymphocytes. Mechanistically, we demonstrated in vitro that lymphocyte-derived mediators influenced differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells through a crosstalk with microglial cells. Among mice grafted with lymphocytes from different patients, we observed diverse remyelination patterns reproducing for the first time the heterogeneity observed in multiple sclerosis patients. Comparing lymphocyte secretory profile from patients exhibiting high and low remyelination ability, we identified novel molecules involved in oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation and validated CCL19 as a target to improve remyelination. Specifically, exogenous CCL19 abolished oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation observed in patients with high remyelination pattern. Multiple sclerosis lymphocytes exhibit intrinsic capacities to coordinate myelin repair and further investigation on patients with high remyelination capacities will provide new pro-regenerative strategies.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28334918