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© Research
Publication : Molecular microbiology

A mannan binding lectin is involved in cell-cell attachment in a toxic strain of Microcystis aeruginosa

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Molecular microbiology - 01 Feb 2006

Kehr JC, Zilliges Y, Springer A, Disney MD, Ratner DD, Bouchier C, Seeberger PH, de Marsac NT, Dittmann E

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 16420359

Mol. Microbiol. 2006 Feb;59(3):893-906

Microcystin, a hepatotoxin that represents a serious health risk for humans and livestock, is produced by the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa in freshwater bodies worldwide. Here we describe the discovery of a lectin, microvirin (MVN), in M. aeruginosa PCC7806 that shares 33% identity with the potent anti-HIV protein cyanovirin-N from Nostoc ellipsosporum. Carbohydrate microarrays were employed to demonstrate the high specificity of the protein for high-mannose structures containing alpha(1–>2) linked mannose residues. Lectin binding analyses and phenotypic characterizations of MVN-deficient mutants suggest that MVN is involved in cell-cell recognition and cell-cell attachment of Microcystis. A binding partner of MVN was identified in the lipopolysaccharide fraction of M. aeruginosa PCC7806. MVN is differentially expressed in mutants lacking the hepatotoxin microcystin. Additionally, MVN-deficient mutants contain much lower amounts of microcystin than the wild-type cells. We discuss a possible functional correlation between microcystin and the lectin and possible implications on Microcystis morphotype formation. This study provides the first experimental evidence that microcystins may have an impact on Microcystis colony formation that is highly important for the competitive advantage of Microcystis over other phytoplankton species.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16420359