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© Pierre Gounon
Entrée de Listeria dans une cellule épithéliale (Grossissement X 10000). Image colorisée.
Publication : Journal of cell science

A comparative study of the actin-based motilities of the pathogenic bacteria Listeria monocytogenes, Shigella flexneri and Rickettsia conorii

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of cell science - 01 Jun 1999

Gouin E, Gantelet H, Egile C, Lasa I, Ohayon H, Villiers V, Gounon P, Sansonetti PJ, Cossart P

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 10318762

J. Cell. Sci. 1999 Jun;112 ( Pt 11):1697-708

Listeria monocytogenes, Shigella flexneri, and Rickettsia conorii are three bacterial pathogens that are able to polymerize actin into ‘comet tail’ structures and move within the cytosol of infected cells. The actin-based motilities of L. monocytogenes and S. flexneri are known to require the bacterial proteins ActA and IcsA, respectively, and several mammalian cytoskeleton proteins including the Arp2/3 complex and VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein) for L. monocytogenes and vinculin and N-WASP (the neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein) for S. flexneri. In contrast, little is known about the motility of R. conorii. In the present study, we have analysed the actin-based motility of this bacterium in comparison to that of L. monocytogenes and S. flexneri. Rickettsia moved at least three times more slowly than Listeria and Shigella in both infected cells and Xenopus laevis egg extracts. Decoration of actin with the S1 subfragment of myosin in infected cells showed that the comet tails of Rickettsia have a structure strikingly different from those of L. monocytogenes or S. flexneri. In Listeria and Shigella tails, actin filaments form a branching network while Rickettsia tails display longer and not cross-linked actin filaments. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that the two host proteins, VASP and (&agr;)-actinin colocalized with actin in the tails of Rickettsia but neither the Arp2/3 complex which we detected in the Shigella actin tails, nor N-WASP, were detected in Rickettsia actin tails. Taken together, these results suggest that R. conorii may use a different mechanism of actin polymerization.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10318762