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Scientific Fields
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Starting Date
01
Jan 2017
Ending Date
01
Feb 2036
Status
Ongoing
Members
5
Structures
2

About

 The importance of MF-GC synaptic diversity for multisensory information processing in the CC

The GC layer of the CC is thought to pre-process incoming mossy fiber (MF) activity so that PCs can more easily distinguish distinct patterns associated specific sensory contexts. The precise combination of internal and external sensory cues indicates a sensory motor state that is then “learned” by association with a feedback signal (supervised learning), in order to fine tune motor movements and cognitive functions. But how the input-specific properties of MF-GC synapses that we recently identified contribute to multisensory stimulus representation and CC computations is not known. In order to formulate specific hypothesis regarding how synaptic diversity and interneuron dendritic integration might influence CC circuit function, we are examining the impact of synaptic diversity on network models and aim to predict future measurements of the critical cellular components of the cerebellar netowork.

Completed projects:

Chabrol, F.P., Arenz, A., Wiechert, M.T., Margrie, T.W., and DiGregorio, D.A. (2015). Synaptic diversity enables temporal coding of coincident multisensory inputs in single neurons. Nature Neuroscience 18, 718-727.

Summary:  Synaptic strength and dynamics is diverse across synapse types, however it is not known how circuits might take advantage of this diversity for specific computations.  In this study we demonstrated that synaptic response diversity reflects the diversity of sensory information entering the cerebellum, and enables a novel temporal coding scheme for multisensory inputs (Chabrol et al., 2015).

Figure 1. Multimodal convergence onto single GCs. (a) Double labeling of primary (1°) and secondary (2°) vestibular afferents, or primary vestibular and visual afferents. AAV9-TurboRFP (magenta) was injected in MVe or PrH of transgenic animals (Thy1-mGFP; green). (b) Example two-photon laser scanning microscopy images of fluorescent MFs in lobule X. (c) Example whole-cell patched GCs filled with Alexa 594 (white) that were found to be connected to VG and MVe or VG and PrH MFs (stars). (d) z-projection of three-dimensional reconstructions of the connected GCs and MFs shown in c.
(d) Voltage responses of single GCs evoked from individual and simultaneous stimulation of supporting (G4 (visual)) and driver MF inputs (G1, 2 (Primary vestibular) and 5 (secondary vestibular)). Early EPSP summation expanded from boxed region (right column) demonstrates combination-specific delays akin to those obtained with single driver MF input stimulation without baseline tonic activity (see a). (e) Comparison of GC firing rates when driven by single inputs (G1, 2, 5 and 3; n = 4, 3, 3 and 5 cells, respectively) versus when combined with input group 4 (or, in one case (square symbol), group 3). Red curve indicates a line with unity slope. (f) Summary plot of combination-specific first-spike latencies.