Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Cédric Delevoye
Cellules infectÈes par Chlamydia trachomatis. Les bactÈries se dÈveloppent dans une vacuole (rouge), ‡ proximitÈ du noyau de la cellule-hÙte (bleu). Ce compartiment interagit de faÁon Ètroite avec ceux de la cellule hÙte. Marquage vert= localisation d'une protÈine de l'hÙte, Vamp8, exprimÈe par transfection. Les Chlamydia sont, selon les souches, responsables de maladies sexuellement transmises, de cÈcitÈs, d'infections pulmonaires et pourraient Ítre impliquÈes dans l'athÈrosclÈrose.
Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique
Starting Date
18
May 2015
Status
Ongoing
Members
2
Structures
1

About

The idea that Chlamydiae have been important in the evolutionary history of Archaeplastida (Plants) was first hinted at by the discovery that a surprisingly large number of genes in the Chlamydia genomes have closely-related genes in plants. A collaborative work led by Steven Ball (CNRS, Lille, France) came to the idea that the crucial step in the emergence of Plants, i.e. the endosymbiosis of the primitive cyanobacteria (which later evolved in the chloroplasts in Green Plants for example), had been facilitated by the concomitant presence ofChlamydia in the host cell. We have brought experimental support to this hypothesis by demonstrating that the enzymes for the assembly and disassembly of glycogen in extant Chlamydia infecting amoebae carry secretion signals, suggesting that the bacteria take control of the glycogen metabolism of the host cytosol. In the “ménage à trois” implicating a primitive eukaryotic cell, a cyanobacterium and a Chlamydia, the secreted chlamydial enzyme could have brought the ability to use ADP-glucose produced by the cyanobacteria, thereby favoring the maintenance of the endosymbiont in the host (Ball et al Plant Cell 2013, Subtil et al TiPS2014).