Tapez votre recherche ici
  • Équipes
  • Membres
  • Projets
  • Événements
  • Appels
  • Emplois
  • publications
  • Logiciel
  • Outils
  • Réseau
  • Équipement

Un petit guide pour l'utilisation de la recherche avancée :

  • Tip 1. Utilisez "" afin de chercher une expression exacte.
    Exemple : "division cellulaire"
  • Tip 2. Utilisez + afin de rendre obligatoire la présence d'un mot.
    Exemple : +cellule +stem
  • Tip 3. Utilisez + et - afin de forcer une inclusion ou exclusion d'un mot.
    Exemple : +cellule -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Compteur
IN
OUT
Contenu 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Personnel Administratif
  • Chargé(e) de Recherche Expert
  • Directeur(trice) de Recherche
  • Assistant(e) de Recherche Clinique
  • Professeur(e)
  • Etudiant(e) M2
  • Aide technique
  • Chercheur(euse) Contractuel(le)
  • Chercheur(euse) Permanent(e)
  • Pharmacien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e) en thèse
  • Médecin
  • Post-doctorant(e)
  • Chef(fe) de Projet
  • Chargé(e) de Recherche
  • Ingénieur(e) de Recherche
  • Chercheur(euse) Retraité(e)
  • Technicien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e)
  • Vétérinaire
  • Visiteur(euse) Scientifique
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre National de Référence
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Plateforme
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) d'Institut
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre National de Référence
  • Chef(fe) de Groupe
  • Responsable de Plateforme
  • Responsable opérationnel et administratif
  • Responsable de Structure
  • Président(e) d'honneur de Département
  • Coordinateur(trice) du Labex
Contenu 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Personnel Administratif
  • Chargé(e) de Recherche Expert
  • Directeur(trice) de Recherche
  • Assistant(e) de Recherche Clinique
  • Professeur(e)
  • Etudiant(e) M2
  • Aide technique
  • Chercheur(euse) Contractuel(le)
  • Chercheur(euse) Permanent(e)
  • Pharmacien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e) en thèse
  • Médecin
  • Post-doctorant(e)
  • Chef(fe) de Projet
  • Chargé(e) de Recherche
  • Ingénieur(e) de Recherche
  • Chercheur(euse) Retraité(e)
  • Technicien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e)
  • Vétérinaire
  • Visiteur(euse) Scientifique
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre National de Référence
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Plateforme
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) d'Institut
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre National de Référence
  • Chef(fe) de Groupe
  • Responsable de Plateforme
  • Responsable opérationnel et administratif
  • Responsable de Structure
  • Président(e) d'honneur de Département
  • Coordinateur(trice) du Labex
Recherche
Revenir
Haut de page
Partagez
Domaines Scientifiques
Maladies
Organismes
Applications
Technique
Date de Début
01
Sep 2018
Date de Fin
01
Sep 2019
Statut
Ongoing
Membres
7
Structures
2

Présentation

Histoplasmosis is an endemic mycosis caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. It is found as a mold in the environment and as a yeast at body temperature during infection. This organism is endemic in various part of the world at the exception of Europe. It is a well-documented infection in the US particularly in the valleys of Ohio and Mississipi but not only (Maiga et al. 2018). It is also endemic in south America, and in Asia. The natural history consists in the inhalation of conidia from the environment (bat or bird guano) leading to acute or chronic primary infection or asymptomatic carriage in immunocompetent individuals. Upon immunosuppression, the fungus can reactivate and be responsible for a localized or disseminated disease. Disseminated histoplasmosis has been classified as an AIDS-defining infection. The pathophysiology and the clinical presentation is very close to that of tuberculosis or cryptococcosis. Laboratory diagnosis of histoplasmosis is mainly based on microscopical visualization of the yeast form, culture (very slow growing fungus – until 8 weeks), antigen detection available in regions of high endemicity and DNA detection. PCR assays have been already developed based on the amplification of various DNA targets (Dantas et al. 2013, Gago et al., 2014, Bialek et al. 2002, Muraosa et al. 2016, Simon et al. 2010). Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) are available (ITS, NAALADase) but based on DNA detection only.

To improve sensitivity, we developed a new qPCR assay allowing amplification of both RNA and DNA of the mitochondrial large sub unit gene of Histoplasma capsulatum. Preliminary results suggest that this new qPCR assay allows diagnosis of histoplasmosis even in the absence of positive microscopy or culture, thus representing the only biological evidence for histoplasmosis. Additionally, qPCR detection in blood is a marker dissemination. This assay could therefore become a helpful tool for the diagnosis and the management of histoplasmosis.

Several collaborations are being established to further validate the assay with different centers where the prevalence of histoplasmosis is high such as in Thailand, Ivory Coast, and South Africa.

 

Financements