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© Research
Publication : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

YgbQ, a cell division protein in Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae, localizes in codependent fashion with FtsL to the division site

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - 23 Apr 2002

Buddelmeijer N, Judson N, Boyd D, Mekalanos JJ, Beckwith J

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 11972052

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2002 Apr;99(9):6316-21

YgbQ is a cell division protein in Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae. In E. coli the ygbQ gene was discovered as a result of a computer search of the E. coli genome designed to find potential interacting partners for cell division protein FtsL. In V. cholerae, ygbQ was identified as an essential gene by using a transposon that fuses genes to an arabinose promoter. The role of YgbQ in cell division is supported by the following. Cells depleted of YgbQ in both organisms form long filaments, but DNA segregation is not affected. YgbQ localizes to the constriction site in wild-type E. coli cells. Localization of E. coli YgbQ to the constriction site depends on cell division proteins FtsQ and FtsL but not FtsW and FtsI, placing YgbQ in the sequential dependency order of proteins localizing to the division site. Localization of green fluorescent protein-FtsL also depends on YgbQ, indicating that FtsL and YgbQ colocalize to the division site in E. coli. Our results show colocalization of proteins to the bacterial midcell in E. coli and raise the possibility that these proteins interact in a coiled-coil structure.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11972052