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© Research
Publication : Journal of pediatric endocrinology & metabolism : JPEM

Ullrich-Turner syndrome: relevance of searching for Y chromosome fragments

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of pediatric endocrinology & metabolism : JPEM - 01 Nov 1999

Damiani D, Guedes DR, Fellous M, Barbaux S, McElreavey K, Kalil J, Goldberg AC, Moreira-Filho CA, Barbosa A, Della Manna T, Dichtchekenian V, Setian N

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 10614539

J. Pediatr. Endocrinol. Metab. 1999 Nov-Dec;12(6):827-31

Forty consecutive patients with Ullrich-Turner syndrome (UTS) were followed-up and investigated for the presence of Y chromosome fragments in their genomes. We used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect SRY (sex-determining region on the Y chromosome) and the sequence-tagged sites (STS) sY57, sY59, sY85, sY94, sY124 and sY157–which correspond to regions 3C (sY57 and 59), 5C, 5G, 5P, and 6F, respectively, of the Y chromosome–searching for Y fragments that could bear the putative locus (loci) for gonadoblastoma (GBY). It has been shown that the presence of GBY greatly increases the risk of dysgenic gonads to undergo malignant transformation. Among our 40 patients, we found Y-derived sequences–including SRY and the region spanning from sY57 to sY94–in two. These two patients had a marker chromosome detected by conventional cytogenetic analysis (45,X/46,X + mar). Their gonads were excised and found to be streaks. In one of the patients, we found foci of primitive sex cords (amidst the gonadal stroma), oviducts and Wolffian remnants. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) did not show Y chromosome material in her gonad-derived fibroblasts. The other girl had hyperplastic Leydig cells in the gonadal stroma, oviducts and Wolffian remnants, with signs of epididymal differentiation. PCR assays performed on DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded gonadal tissue were negative for SRY sequences in both patients. These findings show that all UTS patients should be examined for Y chromosome material, and that positive cases should have their dysgenic gonads excised due to the high risk of malignancy.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10614539