Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Journal of cell science

Transfer of polyglutamine aggregates in neuronal cells occurs in tunneling nanotubes

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of cell science - 18 Jun 2013

Costanzo M, Abounit S, Marzo L, Danckaert A, Chamoun Z, Roux P, Zurzolo C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 23781027

J. Cell. Sci. 2013 Aug;126(Pt 16):3678-85

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by CAG expansion in the huntingtin gene, which adds a homopolymeric tract of polyglutamine (polyQ) to the encoded protein leading to the formation of toxic aggregates. Despite rapidly accumulating evidences supporting a role for intercellular transmission of protein aggregates, little is known about whether and how huntingtin (Htt) misfolding progresses through the brain. It has been recently reported that synthetic polyQ peptides and recombinant fragments of mutant Htt are readily internalized in cell cultures and able to seed polymerization of a reporter wild-type Htt. However, there is no direct evidence of aggregate transfer between cells and the mechanism has not been explored. By expressing recombinant fragments of mutant Htt in neuronal cells and in primary neurons, we found that aggregated fragments formed within one cell spontaneously transfer to neighbors in cell culture. We demonstrate that the intercellular spreading of the aggregates requires cell-cell contact and does not occur upon aggregate secretion. Interestingly, we found that the expression of mutant, but not wild-type Htt fragments, increases the number of tunneling nanotubes, which in turn provide an efficient mechanism of transfer.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23781027