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© Research
Publication : Nucleic acids research

The DNMT3A R882H mutant displays altered flanking sequence preferences

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Nucleic acids research - 06 Apr 2018

Emperle M, Rajavelu A, Kunert S, Arimondo PB, Reinhardt R, Jurkowska RZ, Jeltsch A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 29518238

Nucleic Acids Res. 2018 Apr;46(6):3130-3139

The DNMT3A R882H mutation is frequently observed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). It is located in the subunit and DNA binding interface of DNMT3A and has been reported to cause a reduction in activity and dominant negative effects. We investigated the mechanistic consequences of the R882H mutation on DNMT3A showing a roughly 40% reduction in overall DNA methylation activity. Biochemical assays demonstrated that R882H does not change DNA binding affinity, protein stability or subnuclear distribution of DNMT3A. Strikingly, DNA methylation experiments revealed pronounced changes in the flanking sequence preference of the DNMT3A-R882H mutant. Based on these results, different DNA substrates with selected flanking sequences were designed to be favored or disfavored by R882H. Kinetic analyses showed that the R882H favored substrate was methylated by R882H with 45% increased rate when compared with wildtype DNMT3A, while methylation of the disfavored substrate was reduced 7-fold. Our data expand the model of the potential carcinogenic effect of the R882H mutation by showing CpG site specific activity changes. This result suggests that R882 is involved in the indirect readout of flanking sequence preferences of DNMT3A and it may explain the particular enrichment of the R882H mutation in cancer patients by revealing mutation specific effects.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29518238