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© Research
Publication : Proteins

Temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics gives insights into globular conformations sampled in the free state of the AC catalytic domain

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Proteins - 09 Jun 2014

Selwa E, Huynh T, Ciccotti G, Maragliano L, Malliavin TE

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 24863163

Proteins 2014 Oct;82(10):2483-96

The catalytic domain of the adenyl cyclase (AC) toxin from Bordetella pertussis is activated by interaction with calmodulin (CaM), resulting in cAMP overproduction in the infected cell. In the X-ray crystallographic structure of the complex between AC and the C terminal lobe of CaM, the toxin displays a markedly elongated shape. As for the structure of the isolated protein, experimental results support the hypothesis that more globular conformations are sampled, but information at atomic resolution is still lacking. Here, we use temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics (TAMD) simulations to generate putative all-atom models of globular conformations sampled by CaM-free AC. As collective variables, we use centers of mass coordinates of groups of residues selected from the analysis of standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Results show that TAMD allows extended conformational sampling and generates AC conformations that are more globular than in the complexed state. These structures are then refined via energy minimization and further unrestrained MD simulations to optimize inter-domain packing interactions, thus resulting in the identification of a set of hydrogen bonds present in the globular conformations.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24863163