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© Institut Pasteur/Antoinette Ryter
Salmonella spp. Bactéries à Gram négatif, aérobies ou anaérobies facultatifs à transmission orofécale. Les salmonelles majeures (sérotype typhi et sérotype paratyphi) sont responsables des fièvres typhoïde et paratyphoïde chez l'homme uniquement ; les salmonelles mineures (sérotype typhimurium et sérotype enteritidis) sont impliquées dans 30 à 60 % des gastroentérites et toxiinfections d'origine alimentaire. Image colorisée.
Publication : International journal of medical microbiology : IJMM

Targeting relaxase genes for classification of the predominant plasmids in Enterobacteriaceae

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in International journal of medical microbiology : IJMM - 19 Oct 2013

Compain F, Poisson A, Le Hello S, Branger C, Weill FX, Arlet G, Decré D

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 24342269

Int. J. Med. Microbiol. 2014 May;304(3-4):236-42

Plasmids are the main vectors of antimicrobial drug resistance and virulence genes, especially in Enterobacteriaceae. Identification and classification of plasmids is essential for analysis of their distribution. The most widely used typing method is PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT). A new classification scheme based on relaxase gene typing has been described recently. We propose a practical application of this method, with the development of a multiplex PCR set targeting relaxase genes found on plasmids most frequently encountered in Enterobacteriaceae. This method, here called “plasmid relaxase gene typing” (PRaseT), was validated with 60 transconjugants and transformants harboring various replicon types. The method was tested with 39 multidrug-resistant clinical isolates including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica carrying 1-7 replicons as well as with 17 plasmids non-typeable using PBRT; all replicons were tested in parallel with PBRT for comparison. Six multiplex PCRs and one simplex PCR, including 24 pairs of primers, recognized plasmids of groups A/C, B/O, colE, FIA, FIB, FIC, FV, FIIk, HI1, HI2, I1, K, L/M, N, P1α, Q1, U, W, X1, X2, X3 and X4. There was perfect correlation between PRaseT and PBRT results in 31/39 (79.5%) clinical isolates. Moreover, 11/17 (64.7%) plasmids non-typeable by PBRT could be typed by PRaseT. Our set of multiplex PCRs showed high sensitivity and specificity for the classification of resistance plasmids. It has proved complementary to the widely used PBRT and will improve the monitoring of plasmid distribution in every-day practice.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24342269