Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : ACS infectious diseases

Targeting Polyamines Inhibits Coronavirus Infection by Reducing Cellular Attachment and Entry.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in ACS infectious diseases - 11 Jun 2021

Firpo MR, Mastrodomenico V, Hawkins GM, Prot M, Levillayer L, Gallagher T, Simon-Loriere E, Mounce BC,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 32966040

Link to DOI – 10.1021/acsinfecdis.0c00491

ACS Infect Dis 2021 06; 7(6): 1423-1432

Coronaviruses first garnered widespread attention in 2002 when the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) emerged from bats in China and rapidly spread in human populations. Since then, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) emerged and still actively infects humans. The recent SARS-CoV-2 outbreak and the resulting disease (coronavirus disease 2019, COVID19) have rapidly and catastrophically spread and highlighted significant limitations to our ability to control and treat infection. Thus, a basic understanding of entry and replication mechanisms of coronaviruses is necessary to rationally evaluate potential antivirals. Here, we show that polyamines, small metabolites synthesized in human cells, facilitate coronavirus replication and the depletion of polyamines with FDA-approved molecules significantly reduces coronavirus replication. We find that diverse coronaviruses, including endemic and epidemic coronaviruses, exhibit reduced attachment and entry into polyamine-depleted cells. We further demonstrate that several molecules targeting the polyamine biosynthetic pathway are antiviral in vitro. In sum, our data suggest that polyamines are critical to coronavirus replication and represent a highly promising drug target in the current and any future coronavirus outbreaks.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32966040