Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Mechanisms of development

Slit-Robo signalling prevents sensory cells from crossing the midline in Drosophila

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Mechanisms of development - 01 May 2004

Orgogozo V, Schweisguth F, Bellaïche Y

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 15147761

Mech. Dev. 2004 May;121(5):427-36

Maintenance of bilateral symmetry throughout animal development requires that both left and right halves of the body follow nearly identical patterns of cell proliferation, differentiation, death and migration. During formation of the perfectly bilateral Drosophila larval peripheral nervous system (PNS), the sensory precursor cells of the ventral multidendritic neuron vmd1a originating from each hemisegment migrate away from the ventral midline. Our observations indicate that in slit mutant embryos, as well as in robo, robo2 double mutants, sensory precursor cells of the left and right vmd1a neurons aberrantly cluster at the midline and then the pair of vmd1a neurons migrate to their final position on the same side of the embryo. This results in disruption of PNS bilateral symmetry. Expression of slit at the midline rescues the slit mutant vmd1a phenotype, suggesting that midline-secreted Slit activates Robo/Robo2 signalling to control the migration of the vmd1a sensory precursor cells. Our study indicates that midline-secreted Slit prevents vmd1a sensory cells from crossing the midline and thereby maintains PNS bilateral symmetry during development.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15147761