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© Emeline Camand
Marquage par immunofluorescence d'astrocytes tumoraux ou astrocytomes (lignée cellulaire humaine U373), montrant en rouge, APC et en vert, la tubuline des microtubules. APC est un supresseur de tumeur qui est impliqué dans la polarisation des astrocytes normaux. La localisation d'APC est altérée dans des lignées de gliomes. Pour essayer de corriger, les dérèglements observés lors de la migration des cellules d'astrocytes tumuraux ou gliomes on cherche à connaitre les mécanismes moléculaires fondamentaux qui controlent la polarisation et la migration cellulaire.
Publication : Molecular biology of the cell

Single and collective cell migration: the mechanics of adhesions

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Molecular biology of the cell - 07 Jul 2017

De Pascalis C, Etienne-Manneville S

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 28684609

Mol. Biol. Cell 2017 Jul;28(14):1833-1846

Chemical and physical properties of the environment control cell proliferation, differentiation, or apoptosis in the long term. However, to be able to move and migrate through a complex three-dimensional environment, cells must quickly adapt in the short term to the physical properties of their surroundings. Interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) occur through focal adhesions or hemidesmosomes via the engagement of integrins with fibrillar ECM proteins. Cells also interact with their neighbors, and this involves various types of intercellular adhesive structures such as tight junctions, cadherin-based adherens junctions, and desmosomes. Mechanobiology studies have shown that cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesions participate in mechanosensing to transduce mechanical cues into biochemical signals and conversely are responsible for the transmission of intracellular forces to the extracellular environment. As they migrate, cells use these adhesive structures to probe their surroundings, adapt their mechanical properties, and exert the appropriate forces required for their movements. The focus of this review is to give an overview of recent developments showing the bidirectional relationship between the physical properties of the environment and the cell mechanical responses during single and collective cell migration.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28684609