Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Michaela Muller-Trutwin
HIV
Publication : Virology

Seroepidemiologic, molecular, and phylogenetic analyses of simian T-cell leukemia viruses (STLV-I) from various naturally infected monkey species from central and western Africa.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Virology - 01 Jan 1994

Saksena NK, Herve V, Durand JP, Leguenno B, Diop OM, Digouette JP, Mathiot C, Muller MC, Love JL, Dube S,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 8259665

Virology 1994 Jan; 198(1): 297-310

A study of simian T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus infection, conducted on 747 nonhuman primates belonging to 14 different species in Central and Western Africa, indicated that 4 species (Cercopithecus aethiops, Erythrocebus patas, Papio doguera, and Cercopithecus mona pogonias) had a high prevalence of seropositivity to simian T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus type I (STLV-I). The other nonhuman primate species, however, had negative or low levels of anti-HTLV-I antibodies. STLV-I pol and env DNA was detected in 12 of 12 different animals among the seropositive species. However, STLV-I pX DNA could be detected in only 10 of 12 animals. Comparative phylogenetic analyses based on 140 bp sequence of the pol gene indicate that these STLV-I isolates were 0-9% divergent from each other and were 3.5-7% divergent from the prototype related human retrovirus HTLV-I (ATK). The West African STLV-I isolates formed a unique phylogenetic cluster as did most of the Central African STLV-I isolates, save for STLV-I (Tan 90). The phylogenetic data indicate that cross species transmission of HTLV-I and STLV-I continued to occur long after their ancestral strain separated from the progenitor to HTLV-II. Comparative amino acid analyses indicated that there was marked conservation of the TAX protein regardless of host species, while the pol and REX proteins exhibited increasing levels of diversity.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8259665