Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Microbiology (Reading, England)

SepA, the 110 kDa protein secreted by Shigella flexneri: two-domain structure and proteolytic activity

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Microbiology (Reading, England) - 01 Jul 1998

Benjelloun-Touimi Z, Si Tahar M, Montecucco C, Sansonetti PJ, Parsot C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 9695914

Microbiology (Reading, Engl.) 1998 Jul;144 ( Pt 7):1815-22

Shigellosis is characterized by a strong inflammatory response which is induced by bacteria invading the colonic mucosa. Characterization of a sepA mutant indicated that SepA, the major protein secreted by Shigella flexneri growing in laboratory media, might be involved in invasion and destruction of the host intestinal epithelium. The sequence of the first 500 residues of mature SepA (110 kDa) is homologous to that of the N-terminal region of IgA1 proteases. To investigate the potential proteolytic activity of SepA, the activity of the purified protein on a wide range of synthetic peptides was tested. SepA hydrolysed several of these substrates and the activity was inhibited by PMSF. Several peptides which were hydrolysed by SepA have been described as specific substrates for cathepsin G, a serine protease produced by polymorphonuclear leukocytes that was proposed to play a role in inflammation. However, unlike cathepsin G, SepA degraded neither fibronectin nor angiotensin I and had no effect on aggregation of human platelets. In addition, analysis of SepA hydrolysis by proteinase K suggested that the protein is composed of two domains of about 450 residues separated by a hinge region of 100 residues. The 47 kDa N-terminal domain was stable and endowed with proteolytic activity.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9695914