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© Research
Publication : Human reproduction (Oxford, England)

Screening for microdeletions of Y chromosome genes in patients undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Human reproduction (Oxford, England) - 01 Jul 1999

Krausz C, Bussani-Mastellone C, Granchi S, McElreavey K, Scarselli G, Forti G

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 10402374

Hum. Reprod. 1999 Jul;14(7):1717-21

The potential of assisted reproduction techniques to transmit genetic defects causing male infertility raises questions concerning the need for a systematic genetic screen and counselling. Deletions of the long arm of the Y chromosome are frequently associated with a failure of spermatogenesis. The search for Y specific sequences and for the gene families RNA binding motif (RBM) and deleted in azoospermia (DAZ) have been introduced in many laboratories. The incidence of Y microdeletions varies widely between studies, from 1-55%. These differences are mainly related to study design. The highest incidence of microdeletions has been reported in well selected idiopathic azoospermic patients. Since microdeletions have been reported also in non-idiopathic patients, it is important to define what is the deletion frequency in unselected patients. We report Y chromosome microdeletion screening in 134 unselected patients undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). In the first part of the study we tested six Y chromosome markers. We found three patients with microdeletions (2.2%). Subdivision of the study population revealed a deletion incidence of 4.7% in azoospermic/cryptozoospermic patients; an incidence of 7% in idiopathic patients and an incidence of 16% in idiopathic azoospermic/cryptozoospermic patients. The second part of the study consisted of a screen for the presence of the Y chromosome genes, DBY, CDY, XKRY, eIF-1A, DAZ and BPY2. No additional gene-specific deletions were found. Further data on gene specific screening are needed especially for selected idiopathic patients.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10402374