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© Andres Alcover
Scanning electron microscopy showing a conjugate formed between a T lymphocyte and an antigen presenting cell. It is worth noting the long shape of the T cell (Tc) polarized towards the antigen presenting cell (APC) and the membrane protrusions that adhere the T lymphocyte to the antigen presenting cell.
Publication : Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library

Role of ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) proteins in T lymphocyte polarization, immune synapse formation and in T cell receptor-mediated signaling

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library - 01 May 2006

Charrin S, Alcover A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 16368573

Front. Biosci. 2006;11:1987-97

Following antigen recognition, T lymphocytes undergo strong actin cytoskeletal rearrangements. These play a crucial role in the molecular reorganization at the contact site between the T lymphocyte and the antigen presenting cell, termed the immunological synapse. Moreover, they are necessary for T cell activation that leads to cytokine secretion, T cell proliferation and effector function. Little is known on how membrane and signaling molecules interact with the actin cytoskeleton during these processes. Here we review the function of the ERM family of membrane-microfilament linkers, making emphasis on the role of these proteins in T lymphocyte physiology. We discuss how ERM proteins are involved in membrane reorganization during T lymphocyte polarization and immune synapse formation, and how these proteins may contribute to T cell receptor-mediated intracellular signaling that leads to T cell activation.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16368573