Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Valérie Choumet
Mosquitoes were orally infected with the chikungunya virus. Midguts were dissected at day 5 post-infection, fixed and permeabilised. Virus is shown in red (anti-E2 protein, cyanine 3), the actin network in green (phalloidin 548) and nuclei in blue (DAPI).
Publication : Pathologie-biologie

[Recent developments of spoligotyping as applied to the study of epidemiology, biodiversity and molecular phylogeny of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex]

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Pathologie-biologie - 01 Dec 2000

Sola C, Filliol I, Legrand E, Rastogi N

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 11204924

Pathol. Biol. 2000 Dec;48(10):921-32

Spoligotyping (for ‘spacer-oligonucleotide-typing’), a rapid method for genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex using the principle of reverse hybridization, is based on the structure of the direct repeat (DR) locus. The DR locus is made up of a variable number of 36 bp DR repeats that are separated by unique inter-DR sequences of 35 to 41 bp. Fast and highly discriminatory, spoligotyping is an useful alternative to the IS6110-RFLP reference method for molecular typing of M. tuberculosis, in particular for isolates possessing five or few copies of IS6110. In this paper, we review the state of the art of spoligotyping through its main current applications. After a brief introduction to the principle of the technique and its description, we successively review recently published results concerning the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis in humans and cattle, and discuss the main genotyping strategies currently in use to fingerprint the M. tuberculosis complex organisms. We also describe the recent applications of spoligotyping to study ancient DNA and report on recent developments of this technique to study the biodiversity of the M. tuberculosis complex, its contribution towards improved taxonomy and phylogenetics of the M. tuberculosis complex. Last but not least, potential applications of spoligotyping to study DNA recombination mechanisms are also discussed.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11204924