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© Research
Publication : Animal : an international journal of animal bioscience

Proteome dynamics during contractile and metabolic differentiation of bovine foetal muscle

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Animal : an international journal of animal bioscience - 01 Jul 2009

Chaze T, Meunier B, Chambon C, Jurie C, Picard B

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 22444818

Animal 2009 Jul;3(7):980-1000

Contractile and metabolic properties of bovine muscles play an important role in meat sensorial quality, particularly tenderness. Earlier studies based on Myosin heavy chain isoforms analyses and measurements of glycolytic and oxidative enzyme activities have demonstrated that the third trimester of foetal life in bovine is characterized by contractile and metabolic differentiation. In order to complete this data and to obtain a precise view of this phase and its regulation, we performed a proteomic analysis of Semitendinosus muscle from Charolais foetuses analysed at three stages of the third trimester of gestation (180, 210 and 260 days). The results complete the knowledge of important changes in the profiles of proteins from metabolic and contractile pathways. They provide new insights about proteins such as Aldehyde dehydrogenase family, Enolase, Dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase, Troponin T or Myosin light chains isoforms. These data have agronomical applications not only for the management of beef sensorial quality but also in medical context, as bovine myogenesis appears very similar to human one.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22444818