Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : The Journal of biological chemistry

Properties of monoclonal antibodies selected for probing the conformation of wild type and mutant forms of the P22 tailspike endorhamnosidase

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Journal of biological chemistry - 25 Jun 1990

Friguet B, Djavadi-Ohaniance L, Haase-Pettingell CA, King J, Goldberg ME

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 2141331

J. Biol. Chem. 1990 Jun;265(18):10347-51

Eleven species of monoclonal antibodies directed against the trimeric P22 tailspike endorhamnosidase have been selected and characterized. Seven of these antibodies recognize the native tailspike, both isolated and assembled onto the virion, and prevent phage infection. Four antibodies react with denatured forms of the tailspike as well as with the plastic absorbed tailspike. Three of these latter prevent the tailspike from assembling onto the phage head. The antibodies have been tested against tailspike proteins carrying single amino acid substitutions at 15 different sites on the protein. Two of these mutations interfere with binding by a set of the monoclonals, indicating that they disrupt the epitopes for these antibodies. Since amino acid replacements corresponding to the temperature-sensitive folding mutations do not change the conformation of the native protein, these mutant proteins may be particularly useful for mapping epitopes. Amber fragments of the tailspike chain are recognized predominantly by the anti-denatured antibodies suggesting either that they are conformationally closer to folding intermediates than to the native tailspike or that the epitopes recognized by anti-native antibodies are carried by the C-terminal end of the native protein. Immunochemical detection by an anti-denatured antibody, after sucrose gradient sedimentation of a large 55-kDa amber fragment, indicates a monomeric rather than a trimeric state. This suggests that the missing C-terminal region is important for the trimerization reaction. Such N-terminal amber fragments may be useful models for studying with the monoclonal antibodies the nascent chain emerging from the ribosome.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2141331