Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Schizophrenia research

Predictors and profiles of treatment non-adherence and engagement in services problems in early psychosis

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Schizophrenia research - 04 Mar 2008

Lecomte T, Spidel A, Leclerc C, MacEwan GW, Greaves C, Bentall RP

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 18295458

Schizophr. Res. 2008 Jul;102(1-3):295-302

Treatment adherence in early psychosis individuals is considered problematic. Some studies have tried to understand reasons for medication non-adherence in this population, though few have also considered engagement in services. We conducted a cross-sectional study with 118 early psychosis individuals, assessing multiple constructs (symptoms, insight, personality traits, alliance, childhood trauma, substance abuse, social functioning and sociodemographics) suggested in the literature as potentially linked to medication adherence or engagement in services. Forward Wald logistic regression suggested that more positive symptoms, having witnessed violence as a child and high agreeableness as a personality trait predicted poor medication adherence. Forward linear regression revealed that physical abuse as a child, lack of knowledge regarding consumer rights, difficulties in building an alliance, low neuroticism and high agreeableness predicted poor service engagement. Profiles of non-adherers or low service engagement were strongly linked to childhood trauma, and high agreeableness, as well as more severe symptoms and poor alliance. Males with histories of legal problems were also more prevalent in both groups. No significant differences were found for insight or substance abuse. Overall, individuals with early psychosis who adhered less to treatment in general could have issues with trusting authority and place more importance on peer acceptance. Results are presented in light of the existing literature and clinical implications are discussed.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18295458