Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Institut Pasteur
Cells infected for 24 hrs with C. Trachomatis. The cell nuclei are labelled in blue, the bacteria appear yellow, within the inclusion lumen. A bacterial protein secreted out the inclusion into the host cytoplasm id labelled in red.
Publication : Biochemistry

Physiological ligands ADP and Pi modulate the degree of intrinsic coupling in the ATP synthase of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Biochemistry - 31 Aug 2004

Turina P, Giovannini D, Gubellini F, Melandri BA

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 15323572

Biochemistry 2004 Aug;43(34):11126-34

The proton-pumping and the ATP hydrolysis activities of the ATP synthase of Rhodobacter capsulatus have been compared as a function of the ADP and P(i) concentrations. The proton pumping was measured either with the transmembrane pH difference probe, 9-amino-6-chloro-2-methoxyacridine, or with the transmembrane electric potential difference probe, bis(3-propyl-5-oxoisoxazol-4-yl)pentamethine oxonol, obtaining consistent results. The comparison indicates that an intrinsic uncoupling of ATP synthase is induced when the concentration of either ligand is decreased. The half-maximal effect was found in the submicromolar range for ADP and at about 70 microM for P(i). It is proposed that a switch from a partially uncoupled state of ATP synthase to the coupled state is induced by the simultaneous binding of ADP and P(i).

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15323572