Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)

Nonfunctional regulatory T cells and defective control of Th2 cytokine production in natural scurfy mutant mice

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950) - 07 Oct 2009

Lahl K, Mayer CT, Bopp T, Huehn J, Loddenkemper C, Eberl G, Wirnsberger G, Dornmair K, Geffers R, Schmitt E, Buer J, Sparwasser T

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 19812199

J. Immunol. 2009 Nov;183(9):5662-72

Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are crucial for preventing autoimmunity. We have demonstrated that depletion of Foxp3(+) Tregs results in the development of a scurfy-like disease, indicating that Foxp3(-) effector T cells are sufficient to induce autoimmunity. It has been postulated that nonfunctional Tregs carrying potentially self-reactive T cell receptors may contribute to scurfy (sf) pathogenesis due to enhanced recognition of self. Those cells, however, could not be identified in sf mutants due to the lack of Foxp3 protein expression. To address this issue, we crossed the natural sf mouse mutant with bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic DEREG (depletion of regulatory T cells) mice. Since DEREG mice express GFP under the control of an additional Foxp3 promoter, those crossings allowed proving the existence of “would-be” Tregs, which are characterized by GFP expression in the absence of functional Foxp3. Sf Tregs lost their in vitro suppressive capacity. This correlated with a substantial reduction of intracellular cAMP levels, whereas surface expression of Treg markers was unaffected. Both GFP(+) and GFP(-) sf cells produced high amounts of Th2-type cytokines, reflected also by enhanced Gata-3 expression, when tested in vitro. Nevertheless, sf Tregs could be induced in vitro, although with lower efficiency than DEREG Tregs. Transfer of GFP(+) sf Tregs, in contrast to GFP(-) sf T cells, into RAG1-deficient animals did not cause the sf phenotype. Taken together, natural and induced Tregs develop in the absence of Foxp3 in sf mice, which lack both suppressive activity and autoreactive potential, but rather display a Th2-biased phenotype.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19812199