Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Circulation

Noncultured, autologous, skeletal muscle cells can successfully engraft into ovine myocardium

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Circulation - 16 Jun 2003

Borenstein N, Bruneval P, Hekmati M, Bovin C, Behr L, Pinset C, Laborde F, Montarras D

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 12810607

Circulation 2003 Jun;107(24):3088-92

BACKGROUND: There is compelling evidence showing that cellular cardiomyoplasty can improve cardiac function. Considering the potential benefit of using noncultured muscle cells (little time, lower cost, reduced risk of contamination), we investigated the feasibility of grafting cells obtained directly after enzymatic dissociation of skeletal muscle biopsies into ovine myocardium. We hypothesized that those noncultured muscle cells would engraft massively.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Autologous, intramyocardial skeletal muscle cell implantation was performed in 8 sheep. A skeletal muscle biopsy sample ( approximately 10 g) was explanted from each animal. The sheep were left to recover for approximately 3 hours and reanesthetized when the cells were ready for implantation. A left fifth intercostal thoracotomy was performed, and 10 epicardial injections of the muscle preparation (between 10 and 20 million cells) were carried out. All sheep were euthanized 3 weeks after myocardial implantation. Immunohistochemistry was performed with monoclonal antibodies to a fast skeletal isoform of myosin heavy chain. Skeletal myosin heavy-chain expression was detected in all slides at 3 weeks after implantation in 8 of 8 animals, confirming engraftment of skeletal muscle cells. Massive areas of engraftment (from 2 to 9 mm in diameter) or discrete loci were noted within the myocardial wall.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that noncultured skeletal muscle cells can successfully and massively engraft in ovine myocardium. Thus, avoiding the cell culture expansion phase is feasible and could become a promising option for cellular cardiomyoplasty.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12810607